Brazil’s Second Crop Planting Shifts to Corn

Brazil Corn

This week's US Grains Council Chart of the Week illustrates the dramatic growth in importance of Brazil's winter corn crop (the second crop, traditionally called the little crop).

Historically Brazil's summer crop (first crop) was the major corn crop, planted during its spring (October and November) season-harvested in March and April. However, in recent years corn planting for the winter crop has expanded rapidly, while soybean planting during the spring season has taken area away from the planted corn.

Global Food Security: Current Trends Insufficient

This week's U.S. Grains Council Chart of the Week illustrates the findings of a recently released study that concludes yield growth trends of major crops – corn, rice, wheat and soybeans – are not sufficient to double global crop production by the year 2050 without bringing additional land under cultivation.

A doubling of major crop production is thought to be necessary to meet rising consumer demand driven by population and income growth.

US Corn Prices Have Little Effect on Japanese Meat Prices

It's an undeniable fact that corn represents a large proportion of our foodstuffs. Everything from meat to soda to plastic contains some variety of corn products. Of course, the product that gets the most media attention is gasohol, otherwise known as ethanol. Even with the world's largest ethanol industry, the United States will over time bounce back from 2013's drought-depressed levels to remain the world's leading corn exporter.

US Planted Acres

Prospective Plantings Report

This week's U.S. Grains Council Chart of the Week shows projected acres from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Prospective Plantings Report released today. The report projects increases in planted acres for corn, sorghum and wheat, with very small declines in soybean and barley acres.

Using USDA's trend yield for corn and assuming 90 percent of planted acres are harvested, this amount of planted acres would produce a 363.8 million metric tons (14.323 billion bushel) corn harvest in 2013.

Will Japan be Surpassed as Global Grain Import Leader?

This week's U.S. Grains Council Chart of the Week shows import projections from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Economic Research Service (USDA ERS). Developing economies are surging demand for global grains. Japan has long held the title as the world's largest coarse grain importer, led by world class infrastructure and robust corn imports. However, with a stagnant economy and aging population, recent data suggests they may not only lose the crown, but fall to third place amongst grain importers in less than ten years.

Changing Corn Export Patterns: Ten Year Outlook

U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) projections for changes in corn export patterns

This week's U.S. Grains Council Chart of the Week shows the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) projections for changes in corn export patterns over the coming ten years based on the recently released USDA Agricultural Long-Term Projections to 2022. The United States, former Soviet Union, Argentina, and South Africa are expected to increase export volume. The EU, Brazil, and other current exporters are projected to experience a net decline.

Climbing Poultry Consumption in Developing Countries Reflects Improved Diet Demand

poultry meat consumption in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia

This week's U.S. Grains Council Chart of the Week shows poultry meat consumption in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. The pattern of increased poultry meat consumption in developing countries reflects the growing demand for improved diets. This chart suggests that the higher commodity and input prices in recent years have had little impact on the growth of poultry meat consumption in the developing world.

World Coarse Grain Production and Consumption

world coarse grain (corn, sorghum, and barley) production and consumption over the past 10 years

This week's U.S. Grains Council Chart of the Week shows world coarse grain (corn, sorghum, and barley) production and consumption over the past 10 years.

The chart demonstrates that world production continues to grow, albeit with occasional setbacks. Below-trend U.S. production in 2012 reduced world coarse grain supplies and has led to higher prices that tend to reduce consumption.

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